Categories: Global Tech News

Apple Will No Longer Pre-Install Flash on Any Products

Apple has been critical of Adobe’s Flash technologies for quite some time. In fact, Apple’s CEO Steve Jobs published an “open letter” in April, bashing Flash for being a closed system and proprietary in nature. The company has been a strong proponent of HTML5 as an open source alternative to Flash.

Jobs was also critical of its power consumption when used in iPhones: “Flash was created during the PC era – for PCs and mice… But the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces and open web standards – all areas where Flash falls short.”

The company has now declared war on Adobe, stating that it will no longer pre-install Adobe’s Flash software on any of its products, including the latest iteration of the MacBook Air launched last week.

However, Apple is saying that this move is due to security issues rather than politics. The firm states that there was a risk of accidentally distributing obsolete versions by pre-installing Flash. The onus will now be on Mac users to download the most up-to-date version of the software themselves.

Apple points to a recent incident when an obsolete version of Flash with several known security vulnerabilities shipped with OS X 10.6, known as Snow Leopard. Similar thinking about security recently led the company to deprecate its own version of Java in favor of versions distributed by Oracle.

Recent Posts

AMD Dual-Core Optimization Utility Available

AMD Dual-Core Optimization Utility Available

Improving dual-core compatibility for gaming

5.7″ ZTE ZMAX “Phablet” Coming to T-Mobile Sept 24 for $252

ZMAX will come with a Snapdragon 400 processor and 720p display

100 Northern California Households to Receive Plug-in Priuses

UC Davis dares to go where Toyota won't with the Prius

Apple on Microsoft Ads: PCs Are “No Bargain”, Macs Are “Cool”

An Apple spokesperson fires back over Microsoft's latest commercials

Update: 13.3″ Dell XPS m1330 Notebook Details Leaked

Engadget gets the scoop on Dell's latest "ultra-portable" notebook